2012 Research In Progress

Adherence to Cancer Prevention Guidelines: Survival Analysis to Estimate the Association Between Albertans’ Adherence to Cancer Prevention Guidelines and Subsequent Incidence of Cancer in Alberta’s Tomorrow Project Cohort

Jason Xu, Paula Robson, Heather Whelan, Will Rosner

Our previous study set out to describe to what degree Albertans adhere to cancer prevention guidelines, recommended by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) in 2007. It also explored the factors which influenced the extent of adherence to these cancer specific guidelines in the Alberta’s Tomorrow Project cohort. However, the impact of Albertans’ adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on subsequent cancer incidence was unknown. In this study, we aim to investigate the association between the adherence to cancer prevention guidelines and respective cancer incidence. These results are expected to help researchers understand more about how current cancer prevention guidelines are related to subsequent cancer incidence.

The Pattern of Cancer Screening Utilization in Alberta: A Review of Screening Behaviors of the Tomorrow Project Cohort in Alberta, Canada

Jason Xu, Nathan Solbak, Sanaz Vaseghi, Heather Whelan, S Elizabeth McGregor

Cancer screening guidelines provide important information to physicians and patients regarding optimal practice in early detection of cancers. Mass population screening has been recommended for some cancers. In this project we are using data collected by Alberta’s Tomorrow Project to explore the extent to which healthy Albertan adults (n~30,000) comply with the breast, cervix, colorectal and prostate cancer screening guidelines. Population-based screening is recommended for age-eligible adults for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer but not for prostate cancer where the screening decision should be based on individual preferences and choices about the pros and cons of screening. To determine the trend of screening utilization in Alberta, both baseline data and follow up data that was collected in 2008 will be explored.

Weight Gain During Adulthood in Tomorrow Project Participants

Lorraine Shack, S Elizabeth McGregor, Paula Robson, Heather Whelan, Sanaz Vaseghi, Geraldine Lo Siou, Jennifer Vena, Tiffany Haig

The percentage of Canadians who are overweight or obese has risen dramatically in recent years, mirroring a worldwide phenomenon. In Canada since 1970 the directly measured prevalence of obesity has increased from 10.4% to 22.7% in 2004. Worldwide, it is estimated that 25% of all cancer cases are caused by obesity. In this project we are using data collected by Alberta’s Tomorrow Project to explore weight changes in study participants and its association with age and other potential explanatory factors. Ultimately, this study will help to elucidate factors associated with obesity which can be targeted for population-based prevention programming.

Adherence to Cancer Prevention Guidelines: Analyses of the Baseline Data Collected By Alberta’s Tomorrow Project

Heather Whelan, Sanaz Vaseghi, Jason Xu, S Elizabeth McGregor, Paula Robson

In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research published guidelines on food and nutrition, physical activity, body composition and other modifiable risk factors known to affect the risk of developing cancer and other chronic diseases. In Alberta, little is known about the extent of adherence to cancer prevention guidelines in healthy Albertan adults. The aim of this project is to use data collected by Alberta’s Tomorrow Project to explore the extent to which approximately 30,000 healthy Albertan adults comply with the cancer prevention guidelines.